Don’t Miss Our Maple Sugaring Workshop February 22

Waldo County Soil and Water Conservation District and Maine Forest Service are continuing a series of short field tours to highlight forest stewardship and conservation in Waldo County. These events are open to landowners, foresters, loggers, and others interested in the stewardship of small woodlands, and offer a two-hour opportunity for observation, questions, and discussion of different woodland conditions and management activities.

Thursday, February 22, 2-4 p.m. – Maple Sugaring for the Small Woodlot Owner – Whether you want to tap two trees, or twenty, this demonstration and tour will help get you started. University of Maine Cooperative Extension’s Kathy Hopkins is the state expert on maple syrup, and will give a hands-on presentation of the basics of identifying trees, tapping trees and making syrup, what equipment you need. Kathy will have equipment on display and we’ll have a look at the sugar house (pre-season, in all likelihood). We’ll also take a short walk into the sugar bush to look at both sugar and red maple (hint: you can tap both for maple syrup!). This presentation is geared toward beginners in maple sugaring, especially woodland owners, homeowners and other non-commercial producers, but everyone is welcome. We are grateful to be able to hold this event at Simmons & Daughters Sugar House in Morrill, which is located at 261 Weymouth Road. The sugar house & farm are approximately 2.0 miles west of the center of Morrill village, on the north side of the Weymouth Road. http://www.simmonsanddaughterssugarhouse.com/

(more…)

Join Us This Thursday to Learn About Winter Timber Harvest

Working with Your Woods – January Tour: Winter Timber Harvest

Waldo County Soil and Water Conservation District and Maine Forest Service are continuing a series of short field tours to highlight forest stewardship and conservation in Waldo County. These events are open to landowners, foresters, loggers, and others interested in the stewardship of small woodlands, and offer a brief, two-hour opportunity for observation, questions, and discussion.

The next event is Thursday, January 25, 2-4 p.m., on Winter Timber Harvesting. We’ll visit an active, commercial timber harvest in the town of Brooks, with the logger, forester and landowner on hand. This is a first-entry harvest in a parcel with little prior harvest activity for multiple decades, using a cut-to-length harvest system. We’ll be able to observe and discuss first hand harvest planning and implementation – what is being cut, why it’s being cut, equipment and operational considerations, and the potential of the forest post-harvest. District Forester Morten Moesswilde will lead the discussion. Meet near the corner of Randall Pond Road and Route 203, about 1.7 miles north of the intersection of Route 203 and 131. (more…)

Children’s Workshop on Invasive Forest Pests

POSTPONED! NEW DATE IS TUES. FEB. 6TH AT 3:30. New registrations being accepted. Our District is partnering with Friends of Sears Island (FOSI) to offer after school educational programs under their new Science Squad program. On January 30th, WCSW Technical Director Aleta McKeage will lead children 8-12 in an after school program called Alien Invaders, to be held at the Belfast Free Library. See the graphic below for more information. Other programs will be offered each month, most involving outdoor learning on Sears Island. All programs are free and open to all, and require a parent to attend as well. For more information and to register, visit the FOSI website. Who knew invasive pests could be fun?

Moths in Snow, Let the Maine Forest Service Know!

Male winter moth. Photo: Bo Zamba

Invasive Species Spotlight: The Winter Moth

The invasive winter moth defoliation was first recorded in Maine in 2012 and now the moths have been detected from Kittery to Mount Desert Island. The larvae (caterpillars) of winter moth feed on the leaves deciduous trees and shrubs such as oaks, maples, apples and blueberries, in early spring. Heavy defoliation for several consecutive years leads to branch dieback and tree mortality. Winter moth defoliation has contributed to tens of thousands of acres of oak mortality in Massachusetts and now there is oak mortality in Cape Elizabeth.

Entomologists at the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry’s Maine Forest Service (MFS) are gearing up for winter moth with two initiatives. On Wednesday, November 29th they will be setting out parasitic flies (Cyzenis albicans) in South Portland as part of a biocontrol project to control the invasive winter moth (Operophtera brumata). The MFS is also encouraging the public to report winter moth sightings through an online surveyhttp://www.maine.gov/dacf/wintermothsurvey.      – MFS

For more information: http://www.maine.gov/dacf/mfs/forest_health/documents/winter_moth.pdf

http://www.maine.gov/dacf/mfs/forest_health/invasive_threats/index.htm#wm